Welcome to UkuleleChords.com!

Viva La Ukulele

UkuleleChords.com is the last, the only and the best tool you'll ever use to find high quality ukulele chord diagrams or charts for free! What makes UkuleleChords unique? The extensive ukulele chord chart library includes fingering positions, string notes and fretboard positioning for almost 300 different ukulele chords. While every chord diagram is extremely complete, it still is nicely laid out without being too much. Perfect for both beginning as well as advanced ukulele players.

How does it work? Simple click on the root note you are searching the chord diagram for and there it is, the chord diagram you were looking for! UkuleleChords.com works on both desktop and mobile devices, and is extremely lightweight.

Pick a root note:

  • A
  • A#
  • B
  • C
  • C#
  • D
  • D#
  • E
  • F
  • F#
  • G
  • G#

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

Triad



Seventh



Added



Extended



Suspended

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How to read chord charts?

The UkuleleChords chord diagrams are very easy to understand while still containing a ton of information for beginning and advanced ukulele players. To read an ukulele chord diagram you should imagine watching at an ukulele in front of you while you are looking at the fretboard with the headstock at the top and the body at the bottom. The strings are illustrated as vertical lines (from left to right standard G C E A string) and the frets are the horizontal lines.

Different ukulele chord shapes are represented by dots. Each dot represents the placement of your finger and the number inside the dot shows which finger to use. In the example on the right you can see an A major chord. So how should you place your fingers? You play the G string at the second fret with your middle finger and the C string at the first fret with your index finger. The little circle (o) at the top of the E and A strings means that you have to play that string open (i.e. not place a finger on it).